Medical Media Images

Friday, May 30, 2014

What is a Spinal Discogram Injection? Shown and Explained with Color MRI Images

A "Discogram" is a form of Spinal Injection which doctors perform to get more information about a patient's Spinal Disc. Spine Specialists often try to identify a specific Disc or Discs as the culprit of a patients pain, especially . MRI information about the patient's Spine can help narrow things down, however they only show the Anatomy of the Spine, rather than pinpoint a patient's pain. In some patients the information from the patient's history, physical examination and MRI does make the diagnosis, however in others there is still some uncertainty about which Spinal Disc if any is the culprit of the patient's symptoms. As an example, in some patients the MRI shows more than one abnormal Disc, yet only one Disc may require surgery.

In general, Discograms are performed by either a Pain Management Specialist (Anesthesiologist, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist, Radiologist, etc.) or a Spine Surgeon. These doctors have special training in placing the needle into Spinal Discs and interpreting the results of the injection. Discograms can be performed for Discs in the Neck (Cervical Spine), Mid-Back (Thoracic Spine, and Low-Back (Lumbar Spine).

Lets take a quick look at the Anatomy of the Low-Back (Lumbar Spine) before we take a look at a Discogram of the Low Back. This Color MRI Image is Interactive. As you move your mouse cursor over the Image, Interactive Tags appear. Each Tag displays text which explains a specific part of the Image.



Color MRI Spine Image Lumbar Spine Anatomy
Interactive Color MRI showing the Anatomy of  the Low-Back (Lumbar Spine)


So, how is a Discogram done? After the Skin over the Spine is cleaned with Antiseptics, the Skin is typically anesthetized with a Local Anesthetic. A Discogram Needle is then placed into each Disc with the help of a "live" (second by second pictures) X-Ray machine (Fluoroscope). Typically, more than one Disc is targeted by the Discogram. The Needle is placed into a normal and at least one abnormal Disc. Once the Needle is properly placed and verified with the X-Ray machine, Contrast Dye (and sometimes Anesthetic) is injected directly into the Disc. The Contrast Dye is important since this allows the doctor to see the dye inside the Disc with the help of the X-Ray machine. A normal Disc collects the Dye in its Center without leakage, while an abnormal Disc may allow the dye to leak into the Disc's outer ring (annulus fibrosus) or entirely outside the Disc. The second important piece of information from the Discogram is whether or not a patient feels pain when the dye is injected into the Disc. If pain is felt, it is very important to know if this is the same pain a patient typically feels. This may point to this specific Disc as the culprit of the patient's symptoms. A normal Disc should not cause this type of pain during a Discogram injection. Another piece of information doctors sometime obtain from a Discogram is a pressure reading inside the Disc. The Disc pressure can also help in the determination of a Disc is abnormal. Lastly, some doctors inject an Anesthetic into the Disc at the end of the Discogram to see if a patient will get pain relief from this procedure.
All together then, Discograms are performed to find out if a specific Disc or Discs are responsible for a patient's pain which can help determine if a Disc Surgery could relief this pain.

Now let's take a look at some Color MRI Images of Discograms. The first Image shows a Normal Discogram from a side-view perspective of  the Low-Back (Lumbar Spine). Notice how the contrast dye stays in the center of the Disc. This Image is also Interactive.



Color Lumbar Spine Sagittal MRI Image of a Normal Discogram
Color MRI of a Normal Discogram of the Low-Back (Lumbar Spine) from a side-view perspective (sagittal)

The next Color MRI Image shows the same Discogram injection from a perspective of a slice across the Spine (cross-section). When you put this Image together with the one above, it will give you a 3-Dimensional perspective of the injection. This Image is also Interactive.


Axial Lumbar Spine Color MRI Normal Discogram
Color MRI of a Normal Discogram from a cross-section perspective (axial)
The next Color MRI Image shows an Abnormal Discogram. Notice how the contrast dye leaks backward into a Disc Herniation. This patient would likely experience back pain during the injection which can help guide the doctor. This Image is also Interactive.


Sagittal Color MRI Lumbar Spine Anatomy Abnormal Discogram
Color MRI Image of the Low-Back (Lumbar Spine) of an Abnormal Discogram

The last Color MRI Image shows the same information from the above Image in cross-section. This Image is also Interactive.

Axial Color MRI Image Abnormal Discogram
Color MRI Image of the Low-Back (Lumbar Spine) showing an Abnormal Discogram in cross-section
While Discograms are not a foolproof way to find out which Disc in the Spine is abnormal or painful, it can be a useful tool together with the history and examination of the patient as well as MRI Images. The hope is that this test can improve the likelihood of a successful Spinal Disc Surgery.

If you found this Blog Article useful, here are some other related Spine topics from the MMI Blog:
What is Sciatica? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images
What is an Epidural Injection? Shown and explained with Color MRI Images
What is a Spinal Fusion Surgery of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
What is a "Spondylolisthesis" of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images.
What is an Artificial Disc Replacement of the Neck (Cervical Spine)? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images
Lumbar (low-back) Artificial Disc Replacements shown and explained with the help of Color X-Rays
Disc Herniations of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images


Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images and text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.
 
 
The Content of this Blog Including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images
 
General Disclaimer
Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.
 
 

 

Thursday, May 29, 2014

What is Sciatica? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images


Sciatica means "Spinal Nerve Pain". It is a symptom rather than a specific Disease. The most common reason for Sciatica is Nerve Compression of a Spinal Nerve inside the Spine, typically from a Disc Herniation (slipped disc).

While we typically feel Sciatica as a sharp pain in the leg, it can also be felt as low back pain, buttock pain, tingling, numbness and even weakness in the leg or foot. The specific symptoms often depend on how much irritation, inflammation, or compression of the Spinal Nerve exists. Spinal Nerves which are badly compressed by a large Disc Herniation (slipped disc) can cause significant numbness and weakness in the leg. Milder cases may only be felt as an occasional buttock or leg discomfort.

Lets take a look at the Nervous System on a Color X-Ray Image to learn about the Sciatic and Spinal Nerves. This Image shows you that Sciatica is a bit of a misnomer since not the entire Sciatic Nerve becomes inflamed and painful. Rather, typically only one Spinal Nerve is irritated and inflamed. This Spinal Nerve does become part of the Sciatic Nerve for a short distance, but then branches back out and travels to a specific part of the leg. This is why Sciatica usually only causes pain in one area of the leg, rather than the entire leg. This Image is Interactive. Move your mouse cursor over the Image and you will see the Interactive Image tags appear. Each tag will display text to explain a specific structure on the Image.


Color X-Ray Images of the Spinal Cord, Spinal Nerves, Sciatica
Interactive Color X-Rays showing the Spinal Cord, Spinal Nerves and Sciatic Nerve

Next, we can take a look at the Anatomy of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) to better understand how we develop Sciatica. This Image is also Interactive and tells you about the main parts of our Low Back (Lumbar Spine).


Sagittal Color MRI Lumbar Spine Anatomy
Interactive Color MRI of the Anatomy of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)
The next Color MRI Image shows you what a Normal Spine looks like compared to one with Disc Herniations. Notice how Disc Material has migrated outward from the Center of the Disc (green) to become Disc Herniations (red). In some ways this can be compared to a tube of toothpaste (disc)where the toothpaste leaks out (herniates) if someone steps on it.


Sagittal Lumbar Spine Color MRI Normal Discs and Disc Herniations
Color MRI of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) showing a Normal Spine and one with Disc Herniations

To get a better 3-dimensional sense of how a Disc Herniation causes Sciatica, we have to take a look at MRI slices which are cuts across the spine (cross-sections). Notice the proximity of the Spinal Nerve next to the Spinal Disc. This is the main reason why we get Sciatica. This next Image is also Interactive. Each structure is explained by text.


Axial Lumbar Spine Color MRI Normal Disc, Disc Herniation
Interactive Color MRI of a cross-section of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)
Approximately 90% of patients with Sciatica will get pain relief within 6 weeks, with or without treatment. However, Medications, Physical Therapy, Chiropractic care, Acupuncture, Spinal Injections and other non-surgical treatments can help with pain relief until the inflammation of the Spinal Nerve subsides.

If you liked this quick Visual Review of Sciatica, here other related topics from recent MMI Blogs:
What is an Epidural Injection? Shown and explained with Color MRI Images
What is a Osteoporosis related Spine Fracture (Compression Fracture)? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray, CT, and MRI Images
What is a Spinal Fusion Surgery of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
What is a "Spondylolisthesis" of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images.
Fractured Vertebrae in the Low Back (Lumbar Compression Fracture) shown and explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images 
Spinal Stenosis of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images
Disc Herniations of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images
Lumbar (low-back) Artificial Disc Replacements shown and explained with the help of Color X-Rays
Scoliosis show and explained on Color X-Ray Images
Lumbar Facet Joint Injection for Low Back Pain shown on a Color MRI


Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images and text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.
 
 
The Content of this Blog Including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images
General Disclaimer
Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.
 
 


Wednesday, May 28, 2014

What is a Osteoporosis related Spine Fracture (Compression Fracture)? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray, CT, and MRI Images

Osteoporosis is a disease of "bone thinning and softening" which can affect virtually all of the bones in the human body. The Spine is at particular risk due the fact that most of our body's weight is carried by it. Vertebral fractures are common in patients with advanced stages of Osteoporosis.

It is estimated that 700,000 of these fractures occur each year in the United States. Studies have shown that up to 15% of all women sustain Osteoporosis related fractures. 40% of women over the age of 80 will have suffered from such a fracture.

While we typically think of fractures as events which are related to severe trauma, the reality is that Osteoporosis related fractures can occur with a simple cough, sneeze or minor fall.

In the Spine, the majority of these fractures occur in the mid-back (thoracic spine) and low-back (lumbar spine). The part of the Vertebra which typically fractures is the front, called the "Vertebral Body". This is the large, square shaped part of the Vertebra. It is at the highest risk since roughly 80% of the weight on the Spine is carried by these "Vertebral Bodies". These specific types of fractures are called "Compression Fractures" since the Vertebra is compressed from the top.

Lets take a quick look at the Anatomy of the Spine to help us understand these fractures better.
Here is a Color MRI Image which shows the different parts of the low back (lumbar spine). Notice the square-shaped body of the Vertebra in the front of the Spine. This is the part of the Vertebra most prone to a Osteoporosis related fracture.


Annotated Color MRI Lumbar Spine Anatomy
Color MRI of the Anatomy of the Lumbar Spine (low-back)
 
 

The next Color MRI Image shows a typical Osteoporosis related fracture. Notice how the top of this Vertebra has sunken in.


Color Lumbar Spine MRI Osteoporosis Compression Fracture
Color MRI of a Lumbar (low-back) Compression Fracture
 
The next Image is a Color X-Ray. Compared to the MRI Images above, the X-Ray shows primarily bone structures, which makes it often easier to see a fracture. This Image is Interactive. Scroll your mouse cursor over the Image tags displayed on this Image and see text appear which explains each structure. 


Lateral Lumbar Spine Color X-Ray Compression Fracture
Interactive Color X-Ray of a Lumbar (low-back) Compression Fracture



These fractures can transform a Vertebra into different shapes, depending on which part of the body of the Vertebra is most affected. Here is an example of a fracture in the mid-back (thoracic spine). Notice how the Vertebra is taking on a "pie-shape". This Color X-Ray is also Interactive.


Lateral Thoracic Spine Color X-Ray Osteoporosis Compression Fracture
Interactive Color X-Ray of a Thoracic (mid-back) Compression Fracture



The next Image is a Color MRI Image which shows another mid-back (thoracic spine) fracture. This Image is also Interactive.



Color MRI Thoracic Spine Osteoporosis Compression Fracture
Interactive Color MRI of a Thoracic (mid-back) Compression Fracture


Here is a similar fracture on a Color CT Scan. A CT Scan is a type of "super X-Ray" which shows everything an X-Ray shows, but with far more detail. This Image is also Interactive.

 
Color CT Scan Thoracic Spine Osteoporosis Compression Fracture
Color CT Scan of a Thoracic Spine (mid-back) Compression Fracture
Despite the dramatic appearance of Osteoporosis related fractures on X-Rays, CT, and MRI scans, the majority of these fractures will heal on their own within 6 weeks without surgery. Apart from medications and braces, there are minimally invasive treatments (Vertebroplasty, Kyphoplasty) available for patients who have severe pain and are debilitated despite more conservative treatments such as medications and braces.

If you enjoyed this Blog, here are some other recent MMI Blogs you may want to check out:
What is an Epidural Injection? Shown and explained with Color MRI Images
What is a Spinal Fusion Surgery of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
What is a "Spondylolisthesis" of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images.
How can you tell if a Scoliosis is getting worse? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
Spinal Stenosis of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images



Color X-Ray, CT and Color MRI Images and text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.
 
The Content of this Blog Including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images
General Disclaimer
Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice
 
 

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

What is Ankylosing Spondylitis? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images

Ankylosing Spondylitis is a disease which causes chronic inflammation primarily of the Joints of the Spine (neck, mid-back, low-back, tailbone) and Pelvis (hipbone). This chronic inflammation causes these Joints to form bone spurs, which can eventually form bone bridges. They can be strong enough to connect the Vertebrae together. This often leads to severe stiffness or even a complete Fusion (lack of mobility) of the Spine.

Diseases like Ankylosing Spondylitis are called "autoimmune diseases". Our immune system does not recognize the Spine and Pelvis Joints as our own and sends antibodies to fight them off. This causes severe joint inflammation, pain and degeneration.

Let's take a quick look at a normal Lumbar Spine (low back) before we learn about a Spine affected by Ankylosing Spondylitis.

The Color X-Ray Image below is Interactive. As you move your mouse cursor over the Image, Interactive Image tags appear. Each tag displays text to explain a specific part of the Image.

Color X-Ray of the Lumbar Spine showing Normal Anatomy
Interactive Color X-Ray of the Anatomy of the Lumbar Spine (low back)

 
The next Color X-Ray Image shows a Lumbar Spine (low back) affected by Ankylosing Spondylitis. Notice how bone spurs on the side of the Spine have grown large bone bridges (red arrows) between the Vertebrae. This Image is also Interactive.


Interactive Color X-Ray showing Ankylosing Spondylitis

 The severity of Ankylosing Spondylitis can very widely from relatively mild cases to the very advanced, debilitating ones. Treatments include primarily Medications, Physical Therapy, Postural Exercises. Typically, Rheumatology Doctors manage and monitor the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

Medication management of Ankylosing Spondylitis has significantly improved in recent years. The new group of Medications, called "Biologics" (Tumor Necrosis Factor-a Inhibitors) can even stop the progression of the disease in some patients. These Biologics work by blocking certain Proteins which are present in large quantities in patients with autoimmune diseases such as Ankylosing Spondylitis.

If you liked this Blog, here are other recent topics covered by the MMI blog:

What is an Epidural Injection? Shown and explained with Color MRI Images
What is the "Cervical Spine"? Shown and Explained with Color MRI and Color X-Ray Images
What is Spinal Cord Stimulation? Shown and Explained with Color x-Ray and Color MRI Images
What is a Spinal Fusion Surgery of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
What is a Sacroiliac Joint and why does it cause Pain? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images


If you would like to know more about how MMI creates Color X-Rays and Color MRIs, here is a Video for you:


Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images and text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.
 The Content of this Blog Including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images
 
General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.
 

 

 

 

               


 
 
 
 
 

 

Thursday, May 22, 2014

What is an Epidural Injection? Shown and explained with Color MRI Images

Epidural Injections are commonly performed for Sciatica and Childbirth. The Epidural Space is a small space along our Spine which travels from the Neck to the Low Back. It is located just behind the Spinal Cord and the Spinal Fluid which bathes the Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerves.

Let's first take a look at the Epidural Space on a Color MRI Image to get a better understanding of the Anatomy. The large whole body Color MRI Image shows you where the smaller Low Back (lumbar spine) Image is taken from. The Epidural Space is shown in Pink. Notice how it is located just behind the Spinal Cord (yellow) and Spinal Fluid (light blue). This space is the target of Epidural Injections.


Annotated Color MRI Lumbar Spine Anatomy Epidural Space
Color MRI showing the Anatomy of the Lumbar Spine with a focus on the Epidural Space


When medications are injected into the Epidural Space, they can travel from this space to the Spinal Nerves, which are the target of the Epidural Injection. Steroid medications are commonly injected to help with Sciatica pain. These medications can reduce the inflammation of Spinal Nerves (Sciatica) produced by Disc Herniations and Spinal Stenosis. Local Anesthetic medications can anesthetize Spinal Nerves to control Labor Pain.

The next Color MRI Image shows an Epidural Injection. Notice how the Epidural Needle has to first travel through several Ligaments of the back of the Spine. This is an Interactive Image. As you move your mouse cursor over the Image, Interactive Tags appear. Each tag displays text to explain the important parts of the Image.


Color MRI Sagitall Lumbar Spine Epidural Injection
Interactive Color MRI of the Lumbar Spine showing an Epidural Injection


Next, we will take a look at a cross-section Image of the Spine. Together with the Images above, this will give you a better 3-Dimensional sense of the location of the Epidural Space. On the main Image on the right, the back of the Spine is at the bottom, the front at the top. The Epidural Space is shown in Pink again.


Axial Color MRI Lumbar Spine Anatomy and Epidural Space
Color MRI of the Lumbar Spine in cross-section showing the Anatomy with a focus on the Epidural Space

Now lets take a look at an Epidural Injection on the same cross-sectional view. Notice how the medication (green) which has been injected travels from the larger Epidural Space in the back, around the sides and then forward to the Spinal Nerves (yellow). This next Color MRI Image is Interactive. Just move your cursor over the Image to learn about each part of the Anatomy.


Axial Color MRI Lumbar Spine Epidural Injection Disc Herniation
Interactive Color MRI Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

Epidural Injections are generally safe and effective when performed by experienced medical professionals (Anesthesiologists, Nurse Anesthetists, Pain Management Specialists). One potential complication can occur if the Needle travels too far which can puncture the sac surrounding the Spinal Cord and Spinal Fluid. This can cause a small leak of Spinal Fluid which can result in a severe "Spinal Headache". These Headaches are typically worse when patients are upright and resolve when supine. They almost always resolve in a matter of days. Hydration, pain medications and caffeine can help with the symptoms. In severe cases an "Epidural Blood Patch" can be performed. This is an injection of a small amount of the patient's own blood into the area of the Epidural Space where Spinal Fluid is leaking. The injected blood forms a blood clot which can seal the small hole in the Spinal Fluid sack.

If you liked this blog, here are some other related topics:
1. What is a Spinal Fusion Surgery of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
2.  What is a "Spondylolisthesis" of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images.
3. Fractured Vertebrae in the Low Back (Lumbar Compression Fracture) shown and explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images
4. Spinal Stenosis of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images
5. Disc Herniations of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images
6. Lumbar (low-back) Artificial Disc Replacements shown and explained with thehelp of Color X-Rays
7. The Main "Sections" of our Back explained with a Color MRI of the Whole Body!


If you would like to learn more about how Medical Media Images produces Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images, here is a Video for you:



Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images and text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.
 
 
The Content of this Blog Including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images

 

General Disclaimer

Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

 
 
 




 
 
 
 
 

 

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

What is the "Cervical Spine" (Neck Vertebrae)? Shown and Explained with Color MRI and Color X-Ray Images

The "Cervical Spine" is a medical term used for the part of our neck which includes the Neck Vertebrae, Neck Joints, Spinal Cord, Spinal Nerves, Ligaments, Muscles, Tendons and Blood Vessels. The Trachea (windpipe), Esophagus (swallowing tube) and the large Neck Arteries (carotid) are examples of our neck anatomy which are not part of the Cervical Spine.

Let's take a quick look at some of the Anatomical Structures of the Cervical Spine on a Color MRI Image. This Image is Interactive. As you move your mouse cursor over the Image, Image Tags appear. Each tag displays text to explain a different part of the Anatomy:


Color Brain and Cervical Spine showing Normal Anatomy
Interactive Color MRI of the Cervical Spine and Brain 

The MRI above can show some of the softer, less dense Anatomical Structures which X-Rays cannot show. However X-Ray Images can show the Bone Anatomy of our Cervical Spine very well. This next Color X-Ray Image is also Interactive and explains the most important parts of our Bone Structure.


Cervical Spine Color X-Ray Anatomy
Interactive Color X-Ray of the Cervical Spine

The Cervical Spine has 7 Vertebrae, numbered from the top down as C-1 through C-7. This next Color X-Ray Image shows you the numbering of the Cervical Vertebrae. The C-1 Vertebra differs from the others. It is essentially a ring on which our Skull rests.

 

The function of our Cervical Spine is to hold up and support our Head and to allow the Head to move. Since the Spinal Cord travels within the Vertebrae of our Cervical Spine, it also has to protect the Spinal Cord and prevent too much motion which could injure it. This is a fine balance between enough motion and too much motion.


You may also be interested in these related Blog topics:

What is an Artificial Disc Replacement of the Neck (Cervical Spine)? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images.
Cervical (Neck) Spinal Stenosis explained with Color MRI Images
Chiropractic Cervical Subluxation shown on 3-D Color X-Ray!
New Interactive Color MRI: Prestige Cervical Disc Replacement in Motion
Interactive Color MRI: Cervical Disc Degeneration
Interactive Color MRI of a Cervical (Neck) Disc Herniation Created!

You can learn more about how Medical Media Images creates Color X-Ray and MRI Images in this Video:
 
 
Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images and text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.

The Content of this Blog Including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images



General Disclaimer

Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice

 


 

 



 
 


 
 




 
 
 
 

 

Shoulder Pain from Arthritis? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images

The Shoulder Joint, also called the "gleno-humeral joint" is formed between the "ball" of the upper arm bone (humerus) and the "socket" of  the shoulder blade (glenoid). It is surrounded by a capsule, multiple ligaments and muscles (rotator cuff) which give it stability but allow it move freely. In fact, the shoulder joint is the most mobile joint of the human body.

The cartilage of the shoulder joint is prone to degeneration as it is in other "ball and socket" type joints (hip joint) of the human body. As this cartilage thins out, the bone under it is exposed. This can eventually cause grinding of bone on bone and produce bone spurring.

Common signs of significant arthritis of the shoulder joint are pain in front of the shoulder, stiffness and weakness in the joint.

Let's take a look at the general Bone Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint first. The Color X-Ray Image below is an Interactive Image. As you move your mouse cursor over the Image, Interactive Tags appear. Each tag displays text which explains a specific anatomical structure.



Color X-Ray Normal Shoulder Joint Anatomy
Interactive Color X-Ray of the Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint

Here is the same Color X-Ray Image in 3-D to give you a better 3-Dimensional understanding of the Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint:

3D Color X Ray Normal Shoulder Joint


The Color X-Ray Image below shows a Normal and Degenerated Shoulder Joint. The large whole body Color X-Ray on the left helps to get you oriented. The upper Image on the right is a Color X-Ray of a Normal Shoulder Joint. Notice the amount of space available in the Normal Joint. Below it, a severely degenerated Joint has lost most of its Joint space from severe Arthritis (red arrows).



Color X Ray of Normal and Degenerated Shoulder Joints
Color X-Ray Images of a Normal and Degenerated Shoulder Joint


Here is the Color X-Ray Image of the Degenerated Shoulder Joint in 3-D to show you more detail of  the severe Shoulder Joint Arthritis:

3D Color X Ray Degenerated Shoulder Joint
 
 

Most treatments for Arthritis of the Shoulder Joint focus on Anti-Inflammatory Medications and Physical Therapy. In very severe cases, the Shoulder Joint can be replaced with an Artificial Joint.


If you enjoyed this Blog, here are some related subjects from recent MMI Blogs:
What is Hip Joint Arthritis? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images!
What is a Sacroiliac Joint and why does it cause Pain? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
What is Arthritis of the Hands? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images
Knee Joint Arthritis shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images

 If you like to learn more about how MMI creates Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images you can watch the Video below:

Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images and text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.
   The Content of this Blog Including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images
 

General Disclaimer

Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice



 
 


 
               



 
 
 
 
 

 

Monday, May 19, 2014

What is Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS)? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images

Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) also called "Dorsal Column Stimulation" delivers electrical impulses to the Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerves to disrupt pain signals from reaching our Brain.
The History of this principle of using electricity as a form of "pain treatment" goes back to ancient times when eels were used to deliver their electrical discharges to patient suffering from pain.
This principle was rediscovered in the 1965 when researchers developed the something called the "Gate Control Theory". This theory in simple terms suggests that delivering electrical impulses to the Nerves carrying sensation within the Spinal Cord could subsequently "shut off" the Nerves carrying pain signals. Initially, Spinal Cord Stimulation Devices were implanted directly into the Spinal Cord, however this was deemed too dangerous due to the potential to injury the Spinal Cord in the process. Today, the Spinal Cord Stimulation "Lead" which delivers the electrical impulses to the Spinal Cord is implanted into the "Epidural Space", a space outside of the Spinal Cord.

Let's first review some of the Anatomy of the Spine to understand where and how Spinal Cord Stimulators (SCS) are implanted.

This Spine Image is a Color MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image) produced by Medical Media Images. The whole body Color MRI on the left is designed to orient you in the human body. The main Image on the right is a cut-out of the Lumbar Spine (low back). The main structures of the Lumbar Spine Anatomy are shown:
1. The Spinal Cord in yellow. It actually ends in the upper part of our low back, however a bundle of Spinal Nerves (cauda equina) continues downward.  2. The body of the Vertebra. This is the largest part of the Vertebra. 3. The Spinal Disc which is our natural "cushion" or "shock-absorber" between the Vertebrae. 4. The Spinal Fluid shown in light blue bathes the Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerves providing protection and nutrition. 5. The Epidural Space shown in pink. Notice how this space is located behind the Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerves. It is separated from them by a thin layer of Spinal Fluid. This is the space where the Spinal Cord Stimulation Electrodes are implanted.



Color MRI Lumbar Spine Anatomy
Color MRI Image of the Lumbar Spine Anatomy

The following Spine Image shows you the Spine in cross-section to give you a better 3-Dimensional impression of the location of this epidural Space as well as Spine Anatomy. Notice how the small white box the whole body Color MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) on the left shows you where the large Image on the right is taken from. The Epidural Space is again shown in pink. Other parts of the surrounding Spine Anatomy are shown.


Color MRI Lumbar Spine Anatomy
Color MRI Image of the Lumbar Spine Anatomy in cross-section
 

The next Spine Image is a Color X-Ray Image which shows you the different components of the Spinal Cord Stimulation System. The typical System consists of: 1. An Electrical Generator which is battery powered and implanted under the skin. This Generator produces preset types and patterns of Electrical Impulses. Its computer chips are highly programmable to change many different parameters such as the strength of each impulse, duration, location, etc. A handheld programmer can "talk" to the Generator to turn it on/off and adjusts its programs. 2. A Spinal Cord Stimulation Lead (Electrode) which is implanted in the Epidural Space and delivers the electrical impulses to the Spinal Cord. 3. Connecting Wires which connect the Generator to the Lead.


Color X-Ray Spinal Cord Stimulation
Color X-Ray Image of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System


The Image below is an Interactive version of the above Image. Just move your mouse cursor over the Image and see text appear by each Interactive Tag. 



Color X-Ray Lumbar Spinal Cord Stimulation
Interactive Color X-Ray of a Lumbar Spinal Cord Stimulator
Spinal Cord Stimulation technology is primarily used to control severe pain conditions, however has also shown usefulness to help with angina, reduced blood flow conditions (e.g. diabetic foot issues), and even most recently paralysis. When used to control severe pain, typically a "trial" of  the technology is undertaken to see if it is effective and tolerated.

The use of Spinal Cord Stimulation to help paralyzed patients regain some motor control (initiate movement) is potentially one of the most exciting applications of this technology. A recent Study in the Journal "Brain" showed some success using Spinal Cord Stimulation for Spinal Cord Injury patients.


If you would like to find out more about how Medical Media Images creates Color X-Ray and Color MRI Medical Images, here is a Video for you:


The Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images shown in this Blog as well as the content of the Blog are available for licensing at www.medicalmediaimages.com.

                                        The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images

General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

Thursday, May 15, 2014

What is Hip Joint Arthritis? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images!

The Hip Joint is a "ball and socket" type of Joint. The "ball" of the Thigh Bone (Femur) fits tightly into the "socket" of our Hip Bone (Acetabulum of the Pelvis). Both sides of the joint (Femur and Pelvis) are lined with strong cartilage. A capsule and ligaments surround the Hip Joint and provide it with support, yet allow it to remain quite flexible.

Our body's weight is directly translated through our Hip and Knee Joints which makes them susceptible to degeneration with age and injuries. The Hip Joint is also the second most mobile joint (after the shoulder joint) in the human body which makes it susceptible to wear and tear, eventually causing Arthritis.

Let's first take a look at the Anatomy of the Pelvis to understand how it all fits together. The Image below is an Interactive Color X-Ray. As you move the mouse cursor over the Image, the Interactive Tags become visible. Each tag contains text which explains a specific part of the Anatomy:



AP Pelvis Color X-Ray showing the Sacroiliac and Hip Joints
Interactive Color X-Ray of the Pelvis


The next Image shows the Hip Joints on a Color MRI. The Hip Joints are shown from the front of the body (coronal). This is also an Interactive Image which explains the Anatomy.





Coronal Pelvis Color MRI showing the Hip Joints
Color MRI of the Hip Joints

Here is the same Image in 3-D to give you a better 3-Dimensional Sense of the Anatomy of the Hip Joint. Notice the "ball and socket" appearance of the Hip Joint.

Coronal 3-D Color MRI of the Normal Hip Joints
3-D Color MRI of  the Hip Joints



The next Image shows a Degenerated Hip Joint. The Image on the left shows a whole body Color X-Ray to help orient you. Notice the loss of Joint Space on this Color X-Ray Image. It is this loss of Cartilage from chronic wear and tear which creates the Arthritis. As the Cartilage thins out, the bone surfaces of the Hip Joint are beginning to make contact and form Bone Spurs. This leads to a deformed Hip Joint which looses its mobility and becomes painful with motion. This Image is also Interactive. Enjoy learning from this Image.

AP Pelvis Color X-Ray Hip Joint Arthritis
 
 
 
 
Some patients with severe Hip Joint Arthritis require a Hip Replacement (Total Hip Arhroplasty). The decision for Surgery has to be made with an Orthopaedic Surgeon. Typically, patients will be given an option of anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS), Physical Therapy (PT), and potentially Steroid Hip Injections amongst others before Surgery is considered. The Image below shows a Hip Replacement done for severe degeneration of the Hip Joint. This Image is also Interactive.
  
AP Pelvis Color X-Ray showing a Hip Replacement
 
Interactive Color X-Ray of a Hip Replacement

If you liked this Blog, here are some related topics from our recent Blogs:

1. What is a Sacroiliac Joint and why does it cause Pain? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
2. What is Arthritis of the Hands? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images
3. Knee Joint Arthritis shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images


If you would like to know more about how MMI creates Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images, you can watch the Video below.




Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing at www.medicalmediaimages.com.



           
The content of this blog including text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images.

General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.