Medical Media Images

Monday, April 28, 2014

Knee Joint Arthritis shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images

Arthritis of the Knee Joint is a common medical ailment, which it typically the result of age-related wear and tear.
The Color X-Ray Image below shows Normal Knee Joints. Notice the amount of space shown between the top bone (Femur, large thigh bone), and  the bottom bone (Tibia, larger of the two lower leg bones).



AP Color Knee X-Ray Image of a Normal Knee Joint
Color Knee X-Ray showing a normal Knee Joint space


Over time, the Knee Cartilage (Meniscus) wears down which contributes to the narrowing of the Joint. When a large percentage of the Knee Cartilage is lost, the two bones of the Knee can make contact (bone-on-bone) and form Bone Spurs.
The Color X-Ray Image below shows how the Knee Joint Space has been lost on one side (medial, inside part) of the Knee Joint. This can lead to inflammation and pain (red), as well as stiffness and loss of motion of the Knee Joint.


AP Color Knee X-Ray showing severe DJD
Color X-Ray showing severe degeneration of the Knee Joint
 
Some patients eventually require a Knee Replacement (Total Knee Arthroplasty). The Color X-Ray Image below shows a Knee Replacement (blue). The Knee Replacement typically consists of several parts: 1. A metal (titanium) upper component which is placed at the end of the Femur (thigh bone). 2. A lower metal (titanium) component which is placed on top of the Tibia (larger of the two lower leg bones). 3. A plastic "cushion" which acts like a Meniscus between the upper and lower metal components.
 
Color Knee X-Ray showing a Knee Replacement
Color Knee X-Ray showing a Knee Joint Replacement



 
Color X-Ray Images like the ones shown above are available for Licensing at www.medicalmediaimages.com
 
 

General Disclaimer

Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.
 
The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

What are Artificial Disc Replacements of the Low Back? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images

Artificial Disc Replacements were invented in 1982 by researchers at the East Berlin Charite Hospital. That device, called the "Charite Artifical Disc" was first implanted in patients in 1984.
Since then numerous similar Devices have been invented. Some have gained approval by the FDA.
Currently, two types of Artificial Discs designed for the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) are FDA approved: 1. Prodisc-L Artificial Disc Replacement  2. Charite Artificial Disc Replacement. Both are made by a company called "DePuy-Synthes".

The goal of Artificial Disc Replacements is to replace a diseased Spinal Disc with an Artificial Device which is designed to mimic the function of a Natural Disc. The Natural Disc is a shock-absorber which can move in every direction. To replicate this type of motion has been very challenging for the Medical Device Industry.

Lets take a quick look at the Spinal Anatomy of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) to help us understand a Normal Spinal Disc. This Image is a Color MRI scan which is Interactive. If you move your mouse cursor over the Image, Interactive Tags appear. Each tag explains a specific part of the Image.


Sagittal Lumbar Spine Color MRI Image Spine Anatomy
Interactive Color MRI scan of the Anatomy of the Lumbar Spine (Low Back)


The Color X-Ray Image below demonstrates the bending motion provided by an Artificial Disc Replacement. The Lumbar Spine (low-back) is shown from the side, with the abdomen to the left and the back of the Spine to the right. The Artificial Disc (blue) allows the Spine to bend forward and backward. The dotted lines show the degree of opening and closing this Artificial Disc is capable of. This Image is also Interactive.


Lateral Color X-Ray Artificial Disc Replacement Flexion/Neutral/Extension
Interactive Color X-Ray Images showing an M6-L Artificial Disc Replacement which forward and backward bending

Artificial Disc Replacements can also be used to replace more than one diseased Disc. The Color X-Ray Image below shows two Artificial Disc Replacements implanted at adjacent Spinal Discs.
The black structure at the bottom Disc demonstrates a Spinal Fusion. As the two Discs above the Fusion degenerated over time, two Artificial Disc Replacements were implanted to preserve the mobility of the Spine. This Image is also Interactive.



Lateral Lumbar Spine Color X-Ray Artificial Disc Replacements above Fusion
Interactive Color X-Ray of two Lumbar Artificial Disc Replacements above a Fusion


Artificial Disc Replacements (ADR) are designed to provide some degree of mobility in the Spine as compared to Fusion Surgeries which eliminate mobility. While it makes intuitive sense that mobility would be better than a Fusion, Science has yet to prove that this is the case for the long-term. A number of studies have shown that in the short-term patients seem to do as well or better with the ADR compared to the Fusion, however only long-term (10,20,30 years) studies can prove that this is a better all around option. It is promising however, that the newer designs of ADRs seem to replicate the Natural Disc more closely.

If you enjoyed this Blog, here are some more related Blogs from MMI:

1. What is a Spinal Fusion Surgery of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine)? Shown and explained with Color X-Ray Images
2.  What is an Artificial Disc Replacement of the Neck (Cervical Spine)? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images
3.  What is a Spinal Discogram Injection? Shown and Explained with Color MRI Images
4. Disc Herniations of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images
5.  Spinal Stenosis of the Low Back (Lumbar Spine) shown and explained with Color MRI Images


Here is a Video about how Medical Media Images creates Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images:

 

Color X-Ray Images like the ones shown above are available for Licensing at www.medialmediaimages.com.




                                          The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images


General Disclaimer

Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images

 

 

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

What is a Scoliosis? Shown and Explained with Color X-Ray Images

A Scoliosis is a "S-Shaped" curvature when looking at the Spine from behind. The majority of Scoliosis cases are called "idiopathic", meaning no specific reason is known. These types of Scoliosis cases typically start in our childhood. The Scoliosis Curvature affects primarily the mid-back (thoracic spine) and low back (lumbar spine).

The Image below shows a typical Scoliosis. In the mid-back (thoracic spine), the curvature travels to the left, while the low back (lumbar spine) compensates with a right sided curvature. This allows the patient to appear straight overall. This Image is Interactive. As you move your mouse cursor over the Image, Interactive Image Tags appear. Each Tag explains a specific part of the Image.


Color Scoliosis X-Ray of a Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis
Interactive Color X-Ray of a Scoliosis


 
The next Image shows a more severe Scoliosis. The mid-back (thoracic spine) curvature involves the entire mid-back, and points dramatically to the left. These severe types of Scoliosis can affect the function of the lung and heart, and frequently require Surgery.
 
AP Color X-Ray Image showing a Severe Scoliosis
Color X-Ray Image showing a severe Scoliosis
 
 
The Image below shows a surgical correction of a Scoliosis. Titanium bars are anchored to the Vertebrae with Titanium Screws. The bars stabilize the Spine and allow it to remain straight for the long term.
 
Interactive Color X-Ray of a Scoliosis and a Scoliosis Fusion

 
Not all cases of Scoliosis require Surgery. In most instances, the Orthopaedic Surgeon will take X-Rays at certain intervals to assess the status of the Curvature. Each time, the angle (Cobb Angle) of the curvature is measured to see if it is progressing. By time a person stops growing, so will the Scoliosis.
 
Here is a Blog which explains the Cobb Angle Measurements:
 
 
If you would like to find out more about how Medical Media Images creates Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images, here is a Video:
 
Color X-Ray, Color MRI Images and Text like the ones featured in this Blog are available for Licensing for Websites and Publications at www.medicalmediaimages.com.
 

General Disclaimer

Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images
 
 
 

Monday, April 21, 2014

Cervical (Neck) Spinal Stenosis explained with Color MRI Images

Cervical (Neck) Spinal Stenosis, means a "narrowing of the Nerve Channel in the Neck through which the Spinal Cord travels". This Nerve Channel is also called the "Spinal Canal". The Spinal Canal is made up by the Neck Vertebrae. Each Vertebra has a large opening in its Center. So, when these Vertebrae are stacked on top of each other like they are in our Spine, it creates a long tube, or Nerve Channel. The Spinal Cord travels downward from the base of the Brain through this Nerve Channel.

The Color MRI Image below shows the Spinal Cord in yellow as it travels downward from the Brain through the Spinal Canal. The area outlined in red is where Spinal Stenosis exists. The Spinal Disc (green) between the C-6 and C-7 Vertebrae has degenerated. As a result, bone spurs (red) have formed around the Disc. These bone spurs have grown into the Spinal Canal and are causing narrowing around the Spinal Cord. This is called "Spinal Stenosis".

Sagittal Color MRI demonstrating Cervical Spinal Stenosis
Color MRI of Cervical Spinal Stenosis
 

Images like the one featured above are available for licensing at www.medicalmediaimages.com.




The above text and image are Copyright Medical Media Images.

General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

Thursday, April 17, 2014

The Knee Meniscus shown and explained with Color MRI Images

The Meniscus of the Knee is part of the Knee Cartilage, designed to disperse the weight our body places on our Knee Joints and to limit the friction created by the movement of our Knees. This specialized "Meniscus Cartilage" loosed most of its blood supply when we reach adulthood. Due to that, injuries to the Meniscus are often slow to heal.

The Color MRI Image below shows a Knee Meniscus in Blue. The Knee Joint is shown from the front, made up of the Femur (thigh bone) and Tibia (large lower leg bone). The Meniscus is taller and thicker on the sides and thins towards the middle.



Coronal Color MRI of the Knee Joint showing the Meniscus
Coronal Color MRI of the Knee showing the Meniscus in Blue.
 
 
 
The next Color MRI Image shows the Knee Joint from the side. The Meniscus is again shown in blue.


Sagittal Color Knee MRI Image showing the Meniscus
Sagittal Color MRI of the Knee showing the Meniscus in Blue 


Most acute injuries to the Knee Meniscus occur when the Knee is twisted while bent. This often results in a Meniscus tear. Acute injuries to the Meniscus typically result in swelling of the Joint and increased pain when bearing weight on the Joint. Patients also often complain of Joint locking or clicking when the knee is bent.

Color X-Ray and Color MRI Images like the ones shown above are available for Licensing at www.medicalmediaimages.com.





The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images

General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Degeneration of the Hip Joint explained with Color X-Ray Images

Hip Joint Degeneration is a common medical problem, especially with advancing age and the onset of Arthritis. The Joint Space begins to narrow as the cartilage degenerates. Often small bone spurs form which add to the inflammation and pain. The Images below show what Hip Arthritis looks like on X-Rays. These Images and many more can be licensed at www.medicalmediaimages.com.

The Image below features a whole-body X-Ray on the left and an X-Ray of the Pelvis and Hips as a cut-out. This helps the viewer understand the location of the Hip Joint in reference to the whole body.
The degenerated Hip Joint is shown in red. Due to advanced Arthritis, the Joint Space has narrowed and small bone spurs have formed. The opposite Hip Joint appears wide and smoother. It is common to have more wear and tear in one Hip Joint than the other.



Color X-Ray of the Pelvis showing Hip Joint Arthritis
Color X-Ray Images showing a Degenerated (Arthritic) Hip Joint

Some patients may require a Hip Replacement if pain and dysfunction from advanced Hip Arthritis cannot be managed in non-surgical ways. The Image below shows a Degenerated Hip Joint and a Hip Replacement. Most Hip Replacement consist of a "ball" and a "socket" to resemble a normal Hip Joint. The "socket" component is attached to the Pelvis, while the "ball" component is attached to the Femur (thigh bone) with a long stem.


Color X-Ray Images of Hip DJD and a Total Hip Arthroplasty
Color X-Ray Image showing a Degenerated Hip Joint and a Hip Replacement


The text and images contained in this blog are Copyright Medical Media Images.

General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

The Knee Ligaments (ACL and PCL) shown on Color MRI Images

The Anterior (ACL) and Posterior (PCL) Knee Ligaments play an important role in the stability of the Knee Joint. The two bones which form the Knee Joint are the Thigh Bone (Femur) and the larger of the two Leg Bones (Tibia). The ACL and PCL Ligaments provide stability when these two bones move relative to each other, such as during a sudden stop after running.



Here is a Color MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Image showing the ACL and PCL Ligaments. Each Ligament connects the Femur Bone to the Tibia Bone.


Sagittal Color Knee MRI Image of the ACL and PCL Ligaments
Color MRI Image of the Knee showing the ACL and PCL Ligaments
 

The ACL Ligament is especially prone to injury, such as an ACL Tear. The Image below shows what an ACL Tear looks like on an MRI Image.


Saggital Color Knee MRI Image of a Torn ACL Ligament
Color MRI Images of the Knee showing Normal and Torn ACL Ligaments

 
Torn ACL Ligaments sometimes require a surgical reattachment, especially in patients who want to continue in competitive athletics.




The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images.

General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.





Monday, April 7, 2014

The Main "Sections" of our Back explained with a Color MRI of the Whole Body!

                        
                 What are the different "Sections" of our Back?

Our Spine has 4 different Sections: 1. Cervical (Neck)
                                                         2. Thoracic (Mid-Back)
                                                         3. Lumbar (Low-Back)
                                                         4. Sacral (Tail-Bone)

The Whole Body Color MRI Image below shows each section with the Medical Numbering System included:


Color MRI of the Whole Body showing the different Sections of the Spine
Whole Body Color MRI Image showing the Spine Sections
The Neck (Cervical Spine) has 7 Vertebrae (C-1 to C-7) which connect to the base of the skull at its top and to the mid-back Vertebrae at its bottom
The Mid-Back (Thoracic Spine) has 12 Vertebrae (T-1 to T-12) which connect to the bottom of the Neck Vertebrae at its top and to the top of the Low-Back Vertebrae at its bottom.
The Low-Back (Lumbar Spine) has 5 Vertebrae (L-1 to L-5) which connect to the bottom of the Mid-Back at its top and to the top of  the Tail-Bone at its bottom.
The Tail-Bone (Sacral Spine) consists of a large bone called the Sacrum and smaller bones called the Coccyx at its bottom end.

Images like this one are available for Licensing at our company website www.medicalmediaimages.com.


The above text and image are Copyright Medical Media Images

General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.
 

Neck Curvatures seen on Color X-Ray Images: what is Normal and what is Not?

                                           What is a Normal Neck Curvature?

A Normal Neck Curvature, also called a "Cervical Lordosis" in medical terms, is a smooth "C-Shaped" Curvature which extends from the bottom of our skull to the top of our mid-back (thoracic spine). The Color X-Ray Neck (cervical spine) Image below shows a Normal Neck Curvature with the green line.



Color Cervical Spine X-Ray Image showing a Normal Lordosis
Color Neck X-Ray showing a Normal Curvature

A Normal Curvature like this one allows the moving parts of the Neck (discs and facet joints) to move smoothly and in unison, giving us normal mobility and range of motion.



                       What is an Abnormal Neck Curvature?

An Abnormal Neck Curvature has lost its ideal "C-shaped" Curvature and has become straightened or even forward bent. The Image below shows the loss of the Normal Neck Curvature, resulting in a straight line between the Vertebrae, shown in red. This is called a "Hypolordosis" which means "less than a normal Lordosis (curvature). It is often the result of Disc Disease between the Neck Vertebrae, or chronic Neck Spasms.


Color Neck X-Ray Images showing a Normal Curvature on the right and Abnormal Curvature on the Left

The next Image shows the same information on Color MRI
Color Brain and Cervical Spine MRI showing a Lordosis and Hypolordosis
Color Neck MRI Images showing a Normal Neck Curvature on the right and Abnormal on the Left


Color Cervical Spine X-Ray Image showing a Hypolordosis
Color Neck X-Ray showing a loss of the Normal Neck Curvature



 
The worst form of an Abnormal Neck Curvature is a Neck which is forward bent. The normal "C-Shaped" curvature becomes reversed. This is called a "Kyphosis". The Image below shows this Abnormal Curvature with a red line.


Color Cervical Spine X-Ray Image showing a Kyphosis
Color Neck X-Ray showing an Abnormal Forward Bent (Kyphosis)

A Kyphosis is typically due to severe degeneration of the Discs and Joints between the Vertebrae, such as with long-standing forms of Arthritis. This can result in chronic Neck Pain and loss of normal mobility and range of motion.

Images like the ones featured above are available for Licensing at www.medicalmediaimages.com.




The above text and images are Copyright Medical Media Images


General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.

Friday, April 4, 2014

Fractures shown on 3-D Color X-Rays!

Medical Media Images showcases how 3-D Color X-Ray Images can highlight Fractures in ways never seen before. Fractures can sometimes be difficult to visualize on ordinary Black and White X-Ray Images. Color 3-D X-Rays make fractures visible even to viewers who do not have experience with X-Rays.

Here are two examples of Fractures shown on 3-D Color X-Rays:

1. A Fracture of the Femur, Tibia, and Fibula. This type of Fracture results in a "floating knee" since the Knee is no longer attached to any other bone structure. This is typically a high-energy trauma injury. This image is available at our company website www.medicalmediaimages.com.


Leg Fracture (Femur, Tibia, Fibula) on 3-D Color X-Ray Image
"Floating Knee" Fractures


2. A Wrist Fracture of the Radius Bone. This type of Fracture involves the Wrist Joint. This 3-D Color X-Ray of a Wrist Fracture is available at our company website www.medicalmediaimages.com.


A Distal Radius Fracture (Wrist Fracture) on 3-D Color X-Ray
3-D Color X-Ray, Wrist Fracture
 
 
 
 
 
The above text and image are Copyright Medical Media Images

 

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

3-D Color MRI Image demonstrating a Disc Herniation!

Medical Media Images has created a Color MRI Image to demonstrate the common problem of a Disc Herniation. This MRI Image is unique in several ways: a whole body Color MRI serves to orient the viewer to the specific part of the Spine shown in the cut-out. The cut-out is then converted into a 3-D Color MRI Image to give the viewer depth perception. The Disc Herniation is shown in red at the lowest Disc Level of the Lumbar Spine (low-back). The Disc Herniation represents material which has migrated outward (herniated) from the core of the Disc.

This Image and many more are available at our company website www.medicalmediaimages.com.


3-D Color MRI of the Lumbar Spine demonstrating a Disc Herniation
Color 3-D MRI Image of a Disc Herniation in the Low Back



The text and image contained in this Blog are Copyright Medical Media Images.


General Disclaimer


Medical Media Images does NOT dispense medical or legal advice. Our images, text and any content cannot be used for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition. All Images and content are for information purposes only. You must consult with your physician if you need medical advice. Medical Media Images is not a substitute for medical advice.